Corningware Patterns

In its long history of creating bakeware, CorningWare has produced a large number of coordinating and complimentary product lines including casseroles and similar bakeware to match the ever popular Correlle and Corningware patterns for dinnerware.

Some people are collectors of antique glassware, some of teacups and saucers. But for those who collect Corning Ware Patterns, they may have a pattern that is no longer made or discontinued in their collection. For these types of collectors, this blog post is for you! We will discuss the history behind Corning Ware so that collectors can know how to find vintage patterns and learn about more current patterns as well.

This blog post will be split into multiple sections. First: Corning Ware History, Second: Vintage Corning Ware Patterns, Third, Corningware Designs, and Fourth and lastly, Discontinued Corning Ware Patterns.

Corningware History

Corningware has a rich history tracing back to the late 1800s when it was founded by Dr. Erastus S. Corning of Albany New York with his assistant Philip Wightman at their “Firm of E&PW”. The company was known as “The Cornings,” but in 1925, the trademark name changed to Corning Glass Works due to a consolidation of its management structure. The two men were determined to create porcelain tableware which would not fade or crack as often occurred during those times (source). By experimentation they discovered a new formula for making glass ware stronger than any other company had ever made before – thus creating what is now known as “Pyrex

In 1950, with an interest in developing new products for consumer markets that had been opened by World War II advances in technology; Corning launched their first major product line: Pyrex . This now iconic kitchenware brand is still being manufactured today! Pyrex quickly became popular among consumers because it was made from tempered low-expansion borosilicate glass, which could withstand sudden temperature changes without breaking or cracking like unrefrigerated glass bake ware often did.

This glass was also much more resistant to temperature changes than other materials like metals, and so could be used on the stovetop as well.

The company now faced a choice: continue with their original line of products or expand into this new market? It seemed that Corning had nothing to lose by entering this newer marketplace because it lacked any real competition at all!

Corning decided not only enter the consumer market but go “all-in” and released over 50 different Pyrex patterns in just five years.

Vintage Corningware Patterns

Within the 5 year period, the most popular vintage Corning Ware pattern during this period seems to have been ‘Pansy.’ This pattern consisted of yellow pansies against a blue background – sometimes accented with green leaves scattered around them. Another favorite is called Autumn Leaves. This pattern also contained the same yellow pansies but in addition it had orange and red leaves scattered about. This pan was so popular that many of these vintage Corning Ware patterns have been re-released into this market segment with updates to make them safe for use in microwaves, ovens.

As early as 1950’s they introduced Tufted Leaf which is a pattern with leaves that are deep brown in color and a very light green background. This was followed by the introduction of Birds & Berries which has blue birds against a pink berry design on the surface.

Another popular vintage Corning ware patterns was called Springtime, this had pansies printed all over it as well but this time they were more purple than yellow and there is also an accent of dark orange to go along with them. They then introduced Berry Patch which consisted of red berries set among white flowers again accented in oranges and yellows. The last one I will talk about here is called Poppy Pattern, which consists mainly of large poppies painted onto each piece – some times mixed with other colors like pale lavender.

The first three patterns I talked about were all printed on the surface in a pattern and then some times there would be colors mixed throughout. The next vintage Corningware designs are styles that have no colored designs but instead they had flowers, fruits or other decorations molded into them so when you put your hand up against it, you can feel different textures such as smooth or wavy lines. There was called Avant Garde which has pale lavender shapes with black backgrounds and rows of tiny white dots around the outside edges; this one also came out in a two-color version including gray background and blue flower design. Next is Amber Rose which typically consisted of roses made from browns set against mustard yellow backgrounds – although sometimes these could come in other color combinations such as yellow and pink or red, yellow, blue.

Corning Ware Patterns & Designs

There are two types of patterns that can be found on vintage Corning Ware mugs: a plain pattern with no colors like dots or lines across the mug surface; this one is called “a la mode” and was made from glazed ceramic-glass with white china enamel. The other type had designs in it such as flowers, fruits etc.; these were often molded into the piece so when you touch them they give off different textures for example some parts might feel smooth while others may have wavy line texture to them. There’s Avant Garde which has a smooth surface and has embossed designs on it.

The patterns are often seen as the signature of Corningware products because they were designed to be durable, resist chipping and scratches, have a non-stick ceramic coating inside the bowl or mug that could also be used with metal utensils; these qualities made them an excellent choice for cooks who wanted their dishes to look good even after heavy use.

Corning Ware Patterns typically come in yellow backgrounds – although sometimes these could come in other color combinations such as yellow and pink or red, yellow, blue. There’s no right way to group patterns together but there is one thing all collectors know: not every piece comes with its original pattern so if you see something rare then it’s worth it to take a closer look.

Patterns are often seen as the signature of Corningware products because they were designed to be durable, resist chipping and scratches, have a non-stick ceramic coating inside the bowl or mug that could also be used with metal utensils; these qualities made them an excellent choice for cooks who wanted their dishes to look good even after heavy use. Typically in yellow backgrounds but sometimes there can come in other color combinations such as red, blue and pink background or yellow and white patterned background.

Vintage Corning Ware Patterns

There are a lot of different corning ware patterns that have graced the market. Some vintage Corningware designs include:

  • Abundance
  • April
  • Autumn Meadow
  • Blue Dusk
  • Blue Hearts
  • Blue Heather
  • Blue Velvet
  • Callaway
  • Cornflower
  • Cornflower Blue
  • Country Cornflower
  • Country Cottage
  • Country Festive
  • Duck
  • English Breakfast
  • English Meadow
  • Floral Bouquet
  • Forever Yours
  • Fresh Cut
  • Friendship
  • Fruit Basket & Fruit Too
  • Garden Cat
  • Garden Harvest
  • Indian Summer
  • Lyrics
  • Meadow
  • Medallion
  • Merry Mushroom
  • My Garden
  • Oceanview
  • Orchard Rose
  • Pastel Bouquet
  • Peach Floral
  • Peach Garland
  • Peony
  • Pink Trio
  • Provincial Blue
  • Quilt
  • Rosemarie
  • Shadow Iris
  • Silk and Roses
  • Simple Lines
  • Spice of Life (also known as “Spice o Life”)
  • Strawberry Sunday
  • Summer Blush
  • Sunsations
  • Symphony
  • Trefoil
  • Wheat
  • Wildflower
  • Winter Magic

Some patterns considered vintage corningware are still produced today, such as Cornflower.

Discontinued Corningware Patterns

Some of the discontinued patterns from Corningware are still easy to find. Our best experience finding corning ware has been online. The most popular lines include Cornflower Blue, Floral Bouquet, Country Flowers, Spice of Life (Spice o Life), and Red Lace. The red lace pattern was actually a part of the Pyrex line but it became so popular that they created an entire collection for this particular desig

2 B Corningware, World Kitchen, P 1 B, P 1, and 1 B are all different Corning Ware designs.

One other rare piece is Garden Rose which has a pink background with white roses in varying sizes on each dish or bowl. This one also features gold trimming around some pieces as well as gold ball handles at either end of the dishes; there’s even a matching set for serving food on plates and platters! Another ‘pink’ pattern is called Summer Breeze which comes with brightly colored flowers on top of a white background.

These patterns are popular for many reasons, the first being that they’re easy to match with your favorite baking dish, or other dishes and serveware from either Corning Ware or Pyrex. The designs themselves have been around since the 1950s so if you happen to find vintage pieces at your local thrift store it’s not hard to imagine where these came from – someone probably bought them years ago! And lastly, some of these discontinued patterns can easily sell for $100-$200 on eBay depending on what pattern is involved as well as how rare it happens to be – Floral dish sets might only go for about $40 while Red Lace usually sells upwards of $350 because there were not many made in this design before production ended.